Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Skeleton Pulled From the Antikythera Shipwreck, Pluto's Icy Heart, Record-Breaking Lightning and More

 
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Skeleton Pulled From the Antikythera Shipwreck Could Give Clues to Life Aboard the Vessel
 
Skeleton Pulled From the Antikythera Shipwreck Could Give Clues to Life Aboard the Vessel
 
 
The Founder of the Smithsonian Institution Figured Out How to Brew a Better Cup of Coffee
 
The Founder of the Smithsonian Institution Figured Out How to Brew a Better Cup of Coffee
 
 
World's Oldest Fish Hooks Discovered in Okinawa
 
World's Oldest Fish Hooks Discovered in Okinawa
 
 
The Sordid History of Mount Rushmore
 
The Sordid History of Mount Rushmore
 
 
The Moral Cost of Cats
 
The Moral Cost of Cats
 
 
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Scientists Finally Figured Out Why Pluto Has That Icy Heart
 
Scientists Finally Figured Out Why Pluto Has That Icy Heart
 
 
Migratory Birds May Come Programmed With a Genetic Google Maps
 
Migratory Birds May Come Programmed With a Genetic Google Maps
 
 
A Brief History of America's Complicated Relationship With Wild Horses
 
A Brief History of America’s Complicated Relationship With Wild Horses
 
 
A British Jail Is Paying Artistic Tribute to Oscar Wilde, its Most Famous Inmate
 
A British Jail Is Paying Artistic Tribute to Oscar Wilde, its Most Famous Inmate
 
 
Record-Breaking Lightning Strikes Force Redefinition of the Thunderbolt
 
Record-Breaking Lightning Strikes Force Redefinition of the Thunderbolt
 
 
Visiting Melting Glaciers Can Be Profound. But Is It Morally Wrong?
 
Visiting Melting Glaciers Can Be Profound. But Is It Morally Wrong?
 
 
How the Heated, Divisive Election of 1800 Was the First Real Test of American Democracy
 
How the Heated, Divisive Election of 1800 Was the First Real Test of American Democracy
 
 
Scientists Puzzle Over Unusual Mammoth Skull Unearthed in the Channel Islands
 
Scientists Puzzle Over Unusual Mammoth Skull Unearthed in the Channel Islands
 
 
Today in History: Sponsored by GEICO
 
In 1963, Billie Jean King defeated Bobby Riggs in the exhibition tennis match dubbed the "Battle of the Sexes." King soundly beat Riggs, who claimed he couldn't be beaten by a girl, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. Her $100,000 win, along with the passage of Title IX spurred a new generation of sportswomen. But that was just one chapter in the saga. Dive into the history of women's long-fought battle against sexism in sport.
 
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Photo of the Day
 
Rapa das Bestas is the name of an operation that involves cutting the manes of the wild horses who live free at the mountains in a semi-feral state and that are performed in the curros (enclosed which retain the horses) held in various locations in Galicia (Spain). Those horses live in mountains owned by the villages (a form of property derived from the Suevi, around 8th century) and have several owners (private owners, the parish or the village), each year the foal are marked and the adults shaved and deloused, and then freed again to the mountains. The best known is the Rapa das Bestas of Sabucedo, in the city hall of A Estrada, which lasts three days: the First Saturday, Sunday and Monday in July. In fact, the name given to the celebration (Rapa das Bestas of Sabucedo), while in most places speaking about curros.  It is a noble struggle between man and animal. They sabucedo measure their strength in Pontevedra, where this year have gathered 400 horses. The Aloitador Michael Tourino says proudly: "We do not use sticks or ropes, this is a melee with the animal." The first step is to remove the foals for their safety. A mission entrusted to the smallest. The work of the aloitadores is a matter of skill and strength, but also experience. And it bronco riding, time stops. Horse reduce it by three.  If you leave, you are standing rapa, and if not, as Emilio tells us, aloitador, "we have to play desequilibrase and lay down on the floor to cut their manes." The aloitadora, Lucia Gonzalez, believes that "the time is the most dangerous knock him". The festival ends with the return of the animal to mount. It will be a goodbye. Both sides know that their strength measured again within a year, as from the eighteenth century.
 
"Bestas" Photo by Javier Arcenillas
 
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