Friday, December 23, 2016

Why Do People Tell Ghost Stories on Christmas?, The Fight to Save Heirloom Apple Trees, The First Person to Photograph a Single Snowflake and More

 
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This German Town Is Embedded with Millions of Tiny Diamonds
 
This German Town Is Embedded with Millions of Tiny Diamonds
 
 
When the Serendipitously Named Lovings Fell in Love, Their World Fell Apart
 
When the Serendipitously Named Lovings Fell in Love, Their World Fell Apart
 
 
Why Do People Tell Ghost Stories on Christmas?
 
Why Do People Tell Ghost Stories on Christmas?
 
 
Last Minute Gift: Give a subscription to Smithsonian magazine for only $12!
 
 
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Last Minute Gift: Give a subscription to Smithsonian magazine for only $12!
 
The Top 9 Baffling, Humbling, Mind-Blowing Science Stories of 2016
 
The Top 9 Baffling, Humbling, Mind-Blowing Science Stories of 2016
 
 
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The Fight to Save Thousands of Heirloom Apple Trees
 
The Fight to Save Thousands of Heirloom Apple Trees
 
 
 Why There's A 30-Foot Menorah on the National Mall
 
Why There’s A 30-Foot Menorah on the National Mall
 
 
The Northwest's Earliest
 
The Northwest’s Earliest “Garden” Discovered in British Columbia
 
 
For Your Contributions to Science, I Humbly Bequeath You This Pet Moose
 
For Your Contributions to Science, I Humbly Bequeath You This Pet Moose
 
 
France Is Paving More Than 600 Miles of Road With Solar Panels
 
France Is Paving More Than 600 Miles of Road With Solar Panels
 
 
The Volcano That May Have Killed Off the Neanderthals Is Stirring Once Again
 
The Volcano That May Have Killed Off the Neanderthals Is Stirring Once Again
 
 
This Historical Figure Wore the Label "Snowflake" With Pride
 
This Historical Figure Wore the Label "Snowflake" With Pride
 
 
Why the Japanese Eat Cake For Christmas
 
Why the Japanese Eat Cake For Christmas
 
 
Dyslexia May Be the Brain Struggling to Adapt
 
Dyslexia May Be the Brain Struggling to Adapt
 
 
The Invasive Squirrel That Wasn't
 
The Invasive Squirrel That Wasn't
 
 
Researchers "Translate" Bat Talk. Turns Out, They Argue—A Lot
 
Researchers "Translate" Bat Talk. Turns Out, They Argue—A Lot
 
 
Park Service May Boost Wolf Pack on Isle Royale
 
Park Service May Boost Wolf Pack on Isle Royale
 
 
Today in History
 
In 1888, Vincent van Gogh cut off part of his earlobe with a razor. Following the infamous incident, van Gogh was hospitalized and then checked himself into a mental institution. There he produced Starry Night, among other iconic pieces. Later, he documented what happened in a painting titled, Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear. Read why today one amateur historian is arguing that Van Gogh's self-inflicted wound that fateful night was much more extensive than scholars once thought.
 
 
 
 
Photo of the Day
 
Spade fish appear to dance around several sand tiger sharks off the coast of North Carolina, USA
 
"Nature's Choreography" Photo by Tanya Houppermans
 
 
 
 
 
 
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