Monday, February 20, 2017

When Lincoln Was More a Politician Than an "Honest Abe," Did Washington Really Have Wooden Teeth?, How 43 Giant Presidential Heads Ended Up in a Virginia Field and More

 
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When Lincoln Was More a Politician Than an "Honest Abe"
 
When Lincoln Was More a Politician Than an "Honest Abe"
 
 
Ten Fascinating Presidential Facts to Impress on Presidents' Day
 
Ten Fascinating Presidential Facts to Impress on Presidents' Day
 
 
How 43 Giant, Crumbling Presidential Heads Ended Up in a Virginia Field
 
How 43 Giant, Crumbling Presidential Heads Ended Up in a Virginia Field
 
 
Smithsonian Subscribing Members Could Save on Auto Insurance!
 
 
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Smithsonian Subscribing Members Could Save on Auto Insurance!
 
 
 
Take a Smithsonian Tour of All Things Presidential
 
Take a Smithsonian Tour of All Things Presidential
 
 
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Take a Look Inside These Six Presidential Homes
 
Take a Look Inside These Six Presidential Homes
 
 
George Washington Didn't Have Wooden Teeth—They Were Ivory
 
George Washington Didn’t Have Wooden Teeth—They Were Ivory
 
 
The Founding Fathers and the Women, Not Their Wives, Whom They Wrote To
 
The Founding Fathers and the Women, Not Their Wives, Whom They Wrote To
 
 
Andrew Jackson, America's Original Anti-Establishment Candidate
 
Andrew Jackson, America’s Original Anti-Establishment Candidate
 
 
Family Discovers Rare Letters by Thomas Jefferson
 
Family Discovers Rare Letters by Thomas Jefferson
 
 
The Tradition of Presidential Portraiture, Explained
 
The Tradition of Presidential Portraiture, Explained
 
 
The True Friendship That Saved Abraham Lincoln's Life
 
The True Friendship That Saved Abraham Lincoln's Life
 
 
Five Cool Finds From Google Arts & Culture's Presidents' Day Collection
 
Five Cool Finds From Google Arts & Culture's Presidents' Day Collection
 
 
This Interactive Maps Out the Lives of Former Presidents
 
This Interactive Maps Out the Lives of Former Presidents
 
 
Today in History
 
In 1792, George Washington signed the Postal Service Act into law, creating the U.S. Post Office Department. Colonists had used private carriers before the Revolutionary War to escape censorship by the British Crown, and these publishers, like Benjamin Franklin, lobbied for the creation of an American postal service. Read about how the USPS today deciphers the handwritten addresses on your mail.
 
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The Zebra And the Oxpecker
 
"The Zebra and the Oxpecker" Photo by Yaron Schmid
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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