Monday, March 27, 2017

Researchers Turn Spinach Into Beating Heart Tissue, Largest-Known Dinosaur Footprint Discovered, Is Cancer Unavoidable? and More

 
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Researchers Turn Spinach Leaves Into Beating Heart Tissues
 
Researchers Turn Spinach Leaves Into Beating Heart Tissues
 
 
Largest-known Dinosaur Footprint Discovered in Western Australia
 
Largest-Known Dinosaur Footprint Discovered in Western Australia
 
 
How Will Artificial Intelligence Help the Aging?
 
How Will Artificial Intelligence Help the Aging?
 
 
Smithsonian Subscribing Members Could Save on Auto Insurance!
 
 
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Smithsonian Subscribing Members Could Save on Auto Insurance!
 
 
 
Gender-Neutral Pronoun
 
Gender-Neutral Pronoun “They” Adopted by Associated Press
 
 
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San Diego Breweries Experiment With Recycled Water
 
San Diego Breweries Experiment With Recycled Water
 
 
Fascinating: How Transparent Glass Frogs Mate
 
Fascinating: How Transparent Glass Frogs Mate
 
 
Nearly Two-Thirds of Cancer-Causing Mutations Are Unavoidable, Study Claims
 
Nearly Two-Thirds of Cancer-Causing Mutations Are Unavoidable, Study Claims
 
 
Another Use for Viagra: Curing Hamster Jet Lag
 
Another Use for Viagra: Curing Hamster Jet Lag
 
 
Today in History
 
In 1939, a Illinois High School Association official first popularized the term "March Madness" in an essay celebrating the growing interest in what was then an annual tournament of high school boys' basketball. "When the March madness is on him," he wrote, "midnight jaunts of a hundred miles on successive nights make him even more alert the next day." Read how more than three decades later, the first "March Madness" bracket pool began in a Staten Island bar.
 
Today in History
 
 
 
 
Photo of the Day
 
Jakobshavn Melt- was captured within the Kanjia Fjord, Greenland while on expedition to visually document of one of the largest calving events of 2016.   The objective of the journey was to promote environmental awareness and education of the significant climactic changes occurring in the Arctic. This single calving event produced enough ice to meet the domestic fresh water needs of the United States for six months. The image was captured at 1:00 am during the last sunset before summer's twenty-four hour light.
 
"Jakobshavn Melt" Photo by Kerry Koepping
 
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