Monday, March 6, 2017

Skeletons Found Under a Wine Shop May Be Early Colonists, How a Soap Opera Virus Sickened Hundreds, Amsterdam Is Widening Its Canals and More

 
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How a Soap Opera Virus Felled Hundreds of Students in Portugal
 
How a Soap Opera Virus Felled Hundreds of Students in Portugal
 
 
Skeletons Found Under a Florida Wine Shop May Be Some of America's First Colonists
 
Skeletons Found Under a Florida Wine Shop May Be Some of America’s First Colonists
 
 
Nosy Researchers Are Sniffing a Vintage Library
 
Nosy Researchers Are Sniffing a Vintage Library
 
 
Smithsonian Subscribing Members Could Save on Auto Insurance!
 
 
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Smithsonian Subscribing Members Could Save on Auto Insurance!
 
 
 
How Many Volunteers Does It Take to Transcribe Phyllis Diller's 53,000 Jokes?
 
How Many Volunteers Does It Take to Transcribe Phyllis Diller's 53,000 Jokes?
 
 
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President James Buchanan Directly Influenced the Outcome of the Dred Scott Decision
 
President James Buchanan Directly Influenced the Outcome of the Dred Scott Decision
 
 
Happy 80th Birthday to the First Woman in Space
 
Happy 80th Birthday to the First Woman in Space
 
 
Scientists Track, For the First Time, One of the Rarest Songbirds on Its Yearlong Migration
 
Scientists Track, For the First Time, One of the Rarest Songbirds on Its Yearlong Migration
 
 
This Sea Turtle Ate 11 Pounds of Coins
 
This Sea Turtle Ate 11 Pounds of Coins
 
 
Amsterdam Is Widening Some of Its Canals
 
Amsterdam Is Widening Some of Its Canals
 
 
Today in History
 
In 1857, the Supreme Court ruled that Dred Scott, a slave who had lived in a free state, could not sue for his freedom in court. The reason the court gave was that no black person, free or slave, could claim U.S. citizenship. Dred Scott v. Sanford would go down as a critical moment in the lead-up to the Civil War. Read how President James Buchanan interfered with the court to influence the outcome of the decision.
 
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Rapa das Bestas is the name of an operation that involves cutting the manes of the wild horses who live free at the mountains in a semi-feral state and that are performed in the curros (enclosed which retain the horses) held in various locations in Galicia (Spain). Those horses live in mountains owned by the villages (a form of property derived from the Suevi, around 8th century) and have several owners (private owners, the parish or the village), each year the foal are marked and the adults shaved and deloused, and then freed again to the mountains. The best known is the Rapa das Bestas of Sabucedo, in the city hall of A Estrada, which lasts three days: the First Saturday, Sunday and Monday in July. In fact, the name given to the celebration (Rapa das Bestas of Sabucedo), while in most places speaking about curros.  It is a noble struggle between man and animal. They sabucedo measure their strength in Pontevedra, where this year have gathered 400 horses. The Aloitador Michael Tourino says proudly: "We do not use sticks or ropes, this is a melee with the animal." The first step is to remove the foals for their safety. A mission entrusted to the smallest. The work of the aloitadores is a matter of skill and strength, but also experience. And it bronco riding, time stops. Horse reduce it by three.  If you leave, you are standing rapa, and if not, as Emilio tells us, aloitador, "we have to play desequilibrase and lay down on the floor to cut their manes." The aloitadora, Lucia Gonzalez, believes that "the time is the most dangerous knock him". The festival ends with the return of the animal to mount. It will be a goodbye. Both sides know that their strength measured again within a year, as from the eighteenth century.
 
"Bestas" Photo by Javier Arcenillas
 
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