Wednesday, March 15, 2017

The Case for Going to Venus, The Long Folk History of Beauty and the Beast, Making Tires from Tomato Peels and More

 
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Smithsonian Media Curiosity Council (560x70)
 
The Case for Going to Venus
 
The Case for Going to Venus
 
 
Scientists Successfully Grow Potatoes in Mars-Like Soils
 
Scientists Successfully Grow Potatoes in Mars-Like Soils
 
 
This Patent Was the Hallmark of an Aerosol Whip Cream Empire
 
This Patent Was the Hallmark of an Aerosol Whip Cream Empire
 
 
China Approves Massive National Park to Protect Its Last Big Cats
 
China Approves Massive National Park to Protect Its Last Big Cats
 
 
Five Things You Didn't Realize Were Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities
 
Five Things You Didn’t Realize Were Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities
 
 
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Announcing the Finalists of the Smithsonian.com 14th Annual Photo Contest
 
Researchers Find the First Naturally Fluorescent Frog Species
 
Researchers Find the First Naturally Fluorescent Frog Species
 
 
From Trash To Treads: Turning Tomato Peels and Eggshells Into Tires
 
From Trash To Treads: Turning Tomato Peels and Eggshells Into Tires
 
 
The Storied, International Folk History of Beauty and The Beast
 
The Storied, International Folk History of Beauty and the Beast
 
 
Could This Be the Most Efficient Solar Panel Ever?
 
Could This Be the Most Efficient Solar Panel Ever?
 
 
The First-Ever Blood Bank Opened 80 Years Ago Today
 
The First-Ever Blood Bank Opened 80 Years Ago Today
 
 
Today in History
 
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated on the Ides of March. The murder conspiracy by 60 Roman senators has made the Ides of March infamous, but the day, which marked the first full moon of the new year, was noteworthy long before "Et tu, Brute?" It wasn't just Caesar who needed to pay the day heed, either. Read about 10 other times throughout history that the Ides of March spelled bad news.
 
 
 
 
Photo of the Day
 
Each year I do my best to volunteer photography services to a non-profit in need of visual communication materials to help in fund raising and spread awareness.  I have just returned from a volunteer photography assignment for a foundation named Big Life Foundation working in the  Mbirikani Province of Kenya, Africa. The foundation's primary focus is to support 300 wildlife rangers to protect wildlife from poachers and human conflict when animals leave the protection of the Amboseli National park.   Pictured: Bloodhound named Bone on his morning walk with his handler, Mutinda.  Bone is one of three dogs who are part of the Big Life Foundation's anti-poaching dog unit.  He is one of three security dogs who acts as a tracker for the rangers, often times for long distances.  This year, one of the dogs  played a key role in the arrest of a suspected poacher.  Following a scent of the poacher to his village where rangers uncovered ivory in his home.
 
"Big Life Foundation Dog Security Team Bloodhound Bone" Photo by Mattie Simas
 
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