Thursday, March 23, 2017

The True Story of Pocahontas, The Dark History of Japan's Rabbit Island, Could the Zebrafish Help Cure Blindness? and More

 
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Smithsonian Media Curiosity Council (560x70)
 
A Modern Odyssey: Two Iraqi Refugees Tell Their Harrowing Story
 
A Modern Odyssey: Two Iraqi Refugees Tell Their Harrowing Story
 
 
Could the Tiny Zebrafish Teach Us to Cure Blindness?
 
Could the Tiny Zebrafish Teach Us to Cure Blindness?
 
 
Fighting the Nazis With Fake News
 
Fighting the Nazis With Fake News
 
 
The True Story of Pocahontas
 
The True Story of Pocahontas
 
 
Vandals Deface Rock Art In Chad's Ennedi World Heritage Site
 
Vandals Deface Rock Art In Chad's Ennedi World Heritage Site
 
 
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Announcing the Finalists of the Smithsonian.com 14th Annual Photo Contest
 
India's Ganges and Yamuna Rivers Are Given the Rights of People
 
India's Ganges and Yamuna Rivers Are Given the Rights of People
 
 
How Chuck Berry's Cadillac and His Guitar, Maybellene, Came to the Smithsonian
 
How Chuck Berry’s Cadillac and His Guitar, Maybellene, Came to the Smithsonian
 
 
Newly Discovered Color Movies Show Herbert Hoover's Softer Side
 
Newly Discovered Color Movies Show Herbert Hoover’s Softer Side
 
 
Blind People's Brains Rewire Themselves to Enhance Other Senses
 
Blind People’s Brains Rewire Themselves to Enhance Other Senses
 
 
This Innovator Thought Elevators Should Be Round
 
This Innovator Thought Elevators Should Be Round
 
 
Ancient Crustacean Named After David Attenborough
 
Ancient Crustacean Named After David Attenborough
 
 
San People of South Africa Issue Code of Ethics for Researchers
 
San People of South Africa Issue Code of Ethics for Researchers
 
 
Mathematician Emmy Noether Should Be Your Hero
 
Mathematician Emmy Noether Should Be Your Hero
 
 
Wildfires Have Already Charred Over 2 Million Acres This Year
 
Wildfires Have Already Charred Over 2 Million Acres This Year
 
 
The Dark History of Japan's Rabbit Island
 
The Dark History of Japan's Rabbit Island
 
 
Flirtatious 100-Million-Year-Old Damselflies Found Frozen in Amber
 
Flirtatious 100-Million-Year-Old Damselflies Found Frozen in Amber
 
 
Facial Reconstruction of Medieval Man Sheds Light on England's
 
Facial Reconstruction of Medieval Man Sheds Light on England’s “Ordinary Poor”
 
 
This Echolocating Dormouse Could Reveal the Origins of One of Nature's Coolest Superpowers
 
This Echolocating Dormouse Could Reveal the Origins of One of Nature’s Coolest Superpowers
 
 
Now You Can Measure Male Fertility With A Smartphone App
 
Now You Can Measure Male Fertility With A Smartphone App
 
 
Today in History
 
In 1839, Boston's Morning Post printed the first recorded use of "OK" [oll korrect]. Now one of the most common words in the English language, the paper originally used "OK" in a satirical article about grammar in an era (not unlike today) where abbreviations were all the rage. Read how "OK" became an editorial joke gone wild.
 
 
 
 
Photo of the Day
 
For two years, I've been working on a project that investigates climate change a human experience. Often categorized as an "environmental problem," climate change is a already impacting daily lives- especially among those already living in poverty or more reliant on natural resources for daily sustenance. The project is a five-part series, and thus far, I've documented two chapters: spending one month in Senegal photographing and interviewing the lives of fisherman, herders, and farmers; and one month in Panama documenting the politically autonomous Guna people, who are facing relocation from rising seas and lack of drinking water, among other changes.
 
"A Man Looks Out the Door" Photo by Greta Rybus
 
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