Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Floating Fire Ants in Texas, The First Presidential Pardon, Strange Patents for Back to School Season and More

 
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Remains of 19th-Century Chinese Laborers Found at Pyramid in Peru
 
Remains of 19th-Century Chinese Laborers Found at Pyramid in Peru
 
 
Milk and Sugar Pods That Dissolve in Coffee Could Replace Single-Serve Containers
 
Milk and Sugar Pods That Dissolve in Coffee Could Replace Single-Serve Containers
 
 
The First Presidential Pardon Pitted Alexander Hamilton Against George Washington
 
The First Presidential Pardon Pitted Alexander Hamilton Against George Washington
 
 
Another Danger of the Harvey Flood: Floating Fire Ants
 
Another Danger of the Harvey Flood: Floating Fire Ants
 
 
Last Witch Executed in Europe Gets a Museum
 
Last Witch Executed in Europe Gets a Museum
 
 
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Submit Your Photos to Smithsonian.com's 15th Annual Photo Contest
 
11 Cool, Funny or Just Plain Strange Patents for Back to School
 
11 Cool, Funny or Just Plain Strange Patents for Back to School
 
 
How Robots Could Help the Elderly Age in Their Homes
 
How Robots Could Help the Elderly Age in Their Homes
 
 
How Killing Moose Can Save Caribou
 
How Killing Moose Can Save Caribou
 
 
Chop Suey: An American Classic
 
Chop Suey: An American Classic
 
 
This Texas Museum Was Devastated by Ike. Here's How It Prepared For Harvey
 
This Texas Museum Was Devastated by Ike. Here's How It Prepared For Harvey
 
 
Today in History
 
On this day in 1896, Chinese ambassador to the United States Li Hung Chang served chop suey to his American guests. While some credit Chang's cooks with creating the dish that night, other origin stories of the popular recipe abound. Read why some believe its roots can actually be traced to San Francisco–where, as legend has it, it began as an epic culinary joke.
 
 
 
 
Photo of the Day
 
A farmer maintains the field of cabbage in the early morning in Hanoi, Vietnam. In order to avoid the effects of frost, but still receive sunlight, the beds are covered with clear nylon layers. Every morning, farmers go out and open up nylon to water, maintain and pull them down at the evening.
 
"Maintaining the Vegetable Garden" Photo by Tran Tuan Viet
 
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